tips for Rundown editors

In general I think people should just write it the way they want to write it. You don’t need me to tell you what to do! That said, though, a couple things…

In general I’ve tried to get each week’s Rundown out on Tuesday. That way we can include race reports from the weekend … not that the Rundown needs to be about race reports, but that’s a big part of running.

If I get any submissions, I’ll send them to you, but some weeks I don’t get any. You can use Technorati to find interesting running related posts, if you want. (It’s like a google for blogs). For example, after the New York City Marathon I used Technorati to find posts that included the phrase “nyc marathon.”

Also: try to make the Rundown worth reading even if no one clicks through any of the links. (And you don’t need to include a ton of links, I think it’s fine with as few as three or four). I believe in cutting and pasting and quoting liberally. There is an html code you can use called blockquote. I believe it is our friend. Just stick the text to be quoted within the tags, like this:

<BLOCKQUOTE>
Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow, this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.
</BLOCKQUOTE>

Which will be displayed something like this:

Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow, this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.

I’m not saying you have to use it, but I think it’s effective.